<< December 2009 | Home | February 2010 >>

Donations

Don't forget to donate to Wikileaks! At least all Germans should, if not only because of the TollCollect documents. My share is on its way (50 EUR).

I'm still looking for a charitable cause, but I'll wait until I get to Germany.

Pop Quizz: Programming Language Semantics and Software Engineering

If you're doing OO software development, then chances are high that you recently refactored something like...

class M {
A a;
g() { ...
this.a.m();
this.a.n();
...
}

...into...

class M {                  class A {
A a;
g() { ... f() { m(); n(); }
this.a.f();
... }
}

But did you actually check that your program indeed had the same semantics as the following?

class M {
A a;
g() { ...
var A x = a;
this.a.m();
assert this.a == x;
this.a.n();
...
}

If you usually forgot to do things like this, maybe we might have something for you in the future. No more unsound or faith-based program transformations (but you'll have to learn how to use a theorem prover. Yikes!)

Exercise: Write a program in your favourite OO language that violates the above assertion!

Tags : , , ,

rCOS Modeler Release v1.2.4

New features in the rCOS Requirements Modeler v1.2.4 (22. January 2010):

  • Initial implementation of composable model transformations as outlined in the new publication An integrated Multi-View Model Evolution Framework (J. Innovations in Systems and Software Engineering, Springer, 2009). See the CoCoME case study for an example application.
  • Indication whether the current model is relation and still needs further refinement before it can be used to generate Java code (look out for the coloured box with a "T" for "translatable" next to the model validation button).
  • Colours indicate (additionally to model validation) where you might need to provide more detail in a model (green = everything okay, yellow/red = optional but useful/mandatory details missing).
  • Various bugfixes and usability improvements.
  • Updated framework to TOPCASED 2.7.

This version is still based on Eclipse Ganymede 3.4.2 and not compatible with Eclipse Galileo 3.5.

The rCOS team would like to thank and say Good Bye to Charles Morisset, who joined the Royal Holloway, University of London.

The rCOS team is supported by grants from the Science and Technology Development Fund of Macao SAR.

The Eclipse update site is at http://rcos.iist.unu.edu/eclipse/.Please also see the document about the modeler and the Installation Guide. For additional information, also see the older release notes. Please send any bug reports and suggestions!

Volker Stolz / Wang Xiaoliang

Tags : , ,

The grass is always greener on the other side.

So, here I am, finally returning to Europe. I hope it was the right decision.

Things I won't be getting now are practicing my Mandarin with native speakers, or good weather and beaches for most part of the year. I've also not taken the opportunity to get "filthy rich" in a company doing software model checking (but maybe that chance will come back...). And I'm also still worrying about the expenses in Norway. But maybe polar lights and family-visits for 100EUR instead of 1000EUR make up for it. And I'd never thought that I'd ever have to turn down a job offer from Australia.

I feel a bit sad for leaving. There's still so much work to do here, and as some of you know, there's also a missed opportunity in all this mess that made my departure necessary.

I hope I still can be professionally in touch with Zhiming and his group. There's still some great fun to be had, and interesting research, too.

I'll still be here for a while longer, until around mid-February with a short stint  in Bejing next week and hopefully a stop-over in Germany.

Oslo, here I come.

Nice ass.


Nice ass.
Originally uploaded by mad_vs
Angkor Wat area.

An integrated Multi-View Model Evolution Framework

Published in 'Innovations in Systems and Software Engineering' (special issue for the UML&FM'09 workshop)

Abstract:

A Unified Modeling Language model of a software system can be represented by a sequence of model transformations, starting from an empty model. To effectively support the design of complex systems, transformations help the developer to proceed from an initial requirements model to a platform-specific, executable model. We present a notion of potentially re-orderable model transformations that assist the developer in the design process, and track the semantic dependencies of the different modeling steps. Based on our experience with our own software engineering methodology and modeling tool, we outline a possible implementation, that will support developers in revising their model, and still benefit from any subsequent effort that has been spent on model evolution especially with regard to correctness of the evolving model.

[DOI] [PDF] [Slides]

@ARTICLE{StolzUMLFM09,
author = {Stolz, Volker},
title = {An integrated multi-view model evolution framework},
journal = {Innovations in Systems and Software Engineering},
year = {2009},
doi = {10.1007/s11334-009-0102-7}
}

Presented at the UML&FM'09 workshop (colocated with ICFEM'09, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil).

Take a look at rCOS project pages for more details.

No arguing there


No arguing there
Originally uploaded by mad_vs
Fishing beneath the "No Fishing" sign.

Cantonese lesson 2

入實驗室,撳緊急掣

This is a Cantonese tongue twister: Go into the lab to press the emergency button. Also see:

The first character of the second part of the sentence actually might not be right (I guess Violet will tell me), since it is a "Cantonese" character which last time didn't even render on the Mac (and on Windows you need additional fonts). So given that I can see it *now*, probably means I grabbed the wrong one.
Happy singing!

Horses on the road in Pune, India


Horses on the road
These guys were galloping down the road among the traffic in Pune, India. I didn't even notice that there were two, until reviewing the pictures just now.

All in all TECS Week at Tata was fun, I met a lot of motivated students and young practitioners interested in Testing, Debugging and Verification.

The talks by Patrice Godefroid, Daniel Kröning, Shankar, and Rupak Majumdrar were all excellent, way above par with what you usually see like e.g. for an invited talk somewhere.

Tags : ,